programme

Revisiting All India Progressive Writers’ Association (AIPWA) and Indian People’s Theatre Association (IPTA), 1930s, 194

Home/ Revisiting All India Progressive Writers’ Association (AIPWA) and Indian People’s Theatre Association (IPTA), 1930s, 194
Course TypeCourse CodeNo. Of Credits
Foundation ElectiveSOL2EN3514

Semester and Year Offered: Winter Semester 2021

Course Coordinator and Team: Diamond Oberoi Vahali

Email of course coordinator: diamond@aud.ac.in

Pre-requisites: Interest in literature, cinema, music, theatre, performance, culture and politics. Ideally any student opting for this course should have registered for the first part of this course or must read all the readings which were discussed in the first part.

Aim: This course introduces students to the All India Progressive Writers Association and Indian People’s Theatre Association, the two most significant movements in literature in 1930s and 1940s. The objective of the course is to familiarize the students to the socio-political concerns, debates and dissent existing in literature in India from 1930s to 1950s within the broader context of nationalism and the formation of new India.

The course is an interdisciplinary course, it seeks to situate literature within the context of cinema, music, performance and theatre movements prevalent in India in 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. It also links literature, theatre and cinema to the larger debates around nation building and the formation of new India. This course is the second part and thus a continuation of Revisiting All India Progressive Writers’ Association (AIPWA) and Indian People’s Theatre Association (IPTA), 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, part I. The focus in this part is more on performances, film lyrics and music, protest music, paintings and cinematic art yet this course must not be perceived in isolation but as a continuation of the previous course as the artists under study were a part of both the movements. The course will historically develop the context of IPTA as the previous course had developed the history of AIPWA

The artistic expressions of the artists in this part will be contextualised within the context of the Bengal famine, and various dynamic socio-political processes and mass movements in the 1940s 50s and 60s.

Several documents of IPTA will be specially referred to in this part and the artistic expression of the writers associated with the movements will be contextualised within the creative expression and artistic debates of radical artists across other parts of the world.

As the range of the artistic expressions is vast, the course will mainly focus on texts written in Hindustani and Bangla and will refer briefly to some works in Malayalam, Oriya, Punjabi, Assamese and Marathi.

Brief description of modules/ Main modules:

Only a few of the text and writers listed in the modules will be taken up for detailed discussion, the rest of the text will be discussed through class presentations and student assessments.

Module I: Historical context of Indian people’s Theatre Association

This module will develop the historical context of Indian people’s Theatre Association and will focus on the manifesto, policy draft of IPTA and a few other documents of IPTA and articles by other artists theorising on radical aesthetics.

Module II: Will focus on the film song writers and lyricists, poets, singers, music directors, poems and songs of artists associated with AIPWA and IPTA.

It will focus on the film songs and lyrics of:

Kaifi A’zmi

Majrooh Sultanpuri

Jan Nisar Aktar

Shalinder

Makhdoom Mohiuddin

Kavi Pradeep, Neeraj

Sahir Ludhianvi

Majaz, Bhupen Hazarika

Prem Dhawan, Anil Biswas, Dilip Sharma, Keshav Mahanta, Hemanga Biswas

Sukanto Bhattacharya, Bishnu Dey (and of other lyricists associated with IPTA and AIPWA will also be discussed)

Poems of Kazi Nazrul Islam and Joytindra Moitra

References will be made to Protest poets, singers, music directors, poems and songs of IPTA as well.

The protest poets will be contextualised within the context of other radical singers and movements in music and writings across some other parts of the world

Module II: This module will focus on plays, dance dramas, Choreographed songs, dancers and choreographers and performances and writings by artists associated with IPTA and AIPWA. It will mainly focus on the following plays:

Bijon Bhattacharya Nabanna

Ritwik Ghatak The Lament

Bhaskara Pillai You Made Me a Communist

References will be made to:

Dinabandhu Mitra Nirdarpan

Bijon Bhattacharya Jabanbandi

V.K. Gokak Yugantar

Habib Tanvir: Charandas Chor

Bhisham Sahni: Madhavi

K. A. Abbas Zubeda, Ye Kis ka khoon hai

Theatre productions of Shambu Mitra and experiments and writings of Utpal Dutt and Shambu Mitra will be referred to

Yeh Azadi Kya Jis Me Mazdoor Ka Hak Na He

Sune Hind ke Rehne Wale

K.A. Abbas's Janmabhumi

Sheila Bholia's Call of the Valley and the ballets Spirit of India and India Immortal

Raja Roa’s Burrakatha

and several other plays and performances of IPTA artists

Choregraphed songs – Bhooka Hai Bengal

Dance dramas

Bharat ki Atma and Amar Bharat

The performances in this module will be contextualised within the context of other radical theatre movements and writings on performances in some other parts of the world

Module IV: This module will focus on the films produced in association with IPTA and AIPWA. It will focus on several script writers, directors, producers and film artists. It will mainly focus on the following four films:

Bimal Rai Do Biga Zamine

Ritwik Ghatak Komal Gandhar

Shambu Mitra and K. A. Abbas Dharti ke Lal

Chetan Anand Nicha Nagar

References will be made to:

Uday Shanker Kalpana

Bimal Rai Udayer Pathey

Nemai Ghosh Chinnamul

Raj Kapoor and K. A. Abbas Awara and Shri 420

Ismat Chughtai and M.S. Satyu Gharam Hawa

K.A. Abbas Dr. Kotnis Ki Amar Kahani

Shambu Mitra Jagte Raho

Amrita Pritam Pinjar

K. A Abbas: Film Scripts of Raj Kapoor’s Awara and Shri 420, Zubeida, The One Who did not Come Back

Amar Kumar Garam Coat

Mrinal Sen’s Interview and Calcutta 71

P. Bhaskaran’s and Ramu Kariat’s Neelakuyil (1954), Thoppil Bhasi’s Ningalenne Communistakki (1970) and Raja Rao Garikapati’s Puttillu (1953)

These films will be discussed and contextualised within the scenario of cinematic experimentation in other parts of the world.

References will also be made to paintings and photography of artists associated with AIPWA and IPTA

1. Assessment Details with weights: The assessment for the course may include class presentations, term paper, mid-term exam and end-term exam. The assessment will ensure an engagement with the essence of the course. The students may be asked to write and develop a performance based on any contemporary crisis in the spirit of IPTA for the second part of the course and to interact with a community of folk artists.

 

Tentative Assessment schedule with details of weightage:

S.No

Assessment

Date/period in which Assessment will take place

Weightage

1

Class participation

Throughout the semester

15%

2

Group performance on a contemporary social-political  issue (Reflective writing on the performance )/ Joint presentation by two people on a given topic

Mid semester

20%

 

 

 

 

4

Term paper/Research/process paper

End semester

30%

 

5

Class test/ Interview with a migrant worker/folk artists and a process paper/ portfolio

End semester

35%

 

Reading List: Included within the modules

ADDITIONAL REFERENCE:

  • Topics for Research
  • AIPWA and IPTA and Film Lyrics
  • AIPWA and IPTA and film music and musical compositions
  • Films made by AIPWA and IPTA artists
  • Scripts of films made by AIPWA and IPTA artists
  • Paintings by AIPWA and IPTA artists
  • Plays written and directed by IPTA artists
  • Research on: Joytindra Moitra, Kazi Nazrul Islam, Salil Choudhary, Shambu Mitra, Habib Tanvir, Anil D’silva, Anna Bhau Sathe, Balraj Sahani, Utpal Dutt, Mukunda Das, Sukanto Bhattacharya, Bishnu Dey, and any other artists associated with the two movements.